Future Exhibitions

Albrecht Dürer: The Age of Reformation and Renaissance

Nov 6, 2020–Feb 7, 2021
The brilliant and versatile German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer (1471–1528) lived in the prosperous city of Nuremberg and is renowned as one of the finest printmakers of all time. This exhibition of more than one hundred engravings, etchings, and woodcuts spans almost the entirety of Dürer’s prolific career, beginning with… Read More

A Landmark Repurposed: From Post Office to Art Museum

Jan 8, 2021–Jan 9, 2022
Celebrating the Frist Art Museum’s 20th anniversary, this reimagined exhibition highlights the landmark building’s role as a civic institution, from its creation as Nashville’s main post office in 1934 to its reopening as a museum on April 8, 2001. Through photos, video, and interviews, visitors will learn about the building’s… Read More

Liliana Porter: Man with Axe and Other Stories

Feb 5–May 2, 2021
Argentina-born artist Liliana Porter’s provocative arrangements of objects and toys tell stories that are at once psychologically charged and slyly humorous. The centerpiece of the exhibition, Man with Axe, features a tiny plastic figure of an axe-wielding man who appears to have demolished an array of items, from dollhouse furniture to… Read More

Creating the American West in Art

Mar 5–Jun 27, 2021
The American West is an idea and a process as much as it is a location. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, depictions of the people, landscapes, and wildlife of the West fostered a sense of American identity that was rooted in a pioneering spirit of adventure and opportunity. Through… Read More

Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style

Jun 18–Sep 12, 2021
At the end of the 19th century, the Glasgow Style emerged as the major manifestation of Art Nouveau in Britain. This exhibition showcases Charles Rennie Mackintosh—the greatest exponent of the Glasgow Style—as an architect, designer, and artist, and contextualizes his production within a larger circle of designers and craftspeople in… Read More

Bethany Collins: Evensong

Jun 18–Sep 12, 2021
Chicago-based artist Bethany Collins (b. 1984) explores the intersection of language and race in her conceptually driven practice. She alters existing documents—such as the daily Birmingham News from 1963 or the U.S. Department of Justice’s report on the Ferguson, Missouri, police department—to critique the truthfulness and completeness of the official record. Since 2016, Collins… Read More

Kara Walker: Cut to the Quick
From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

Jul 23–Oct 10, 2021
A leading artist of her generation, Kara Walker (b. 1969) works in a range of mediums, including prints, drawings, paintings, sculpture, film, and the large-scale silhouette cutouts for which she is perhaps most recognized. Her powerful and provocative images employ contradictions to critique the painful legacies of slavery, sexism, violence, imperialism, and other power structures, including those in the history and hierarchies of art and contemporary culture. Read More

American Art Deco: Designing for the People, 1918–1939

Oct 8, 2021–Jan 2, 2022
Appropriately presented within the Frist’s own art deco interior during the museum’s 20th anniversary year, this exhibition offers an in-depth examination of an international style that manifested stateside in decorative arts, fine arts, architecture, and design during the 1920s and 1930s. Read More

Mary Sibande

Oct 8, 2021–Jan 2, 2022
Johannesburg-based Mary Sibande creates hyperrealistic figurative sculptures, photographs, and virtual reality installations that address inequities of race, gender, politics, and economics in postcolonial South Africa. Read More

Medieval Bologna:
Art for a University City

Nov 5, 2021–Jan 30, 2022
This is the first museum exhibition in the United States to focus on medieval art made in the northern Italian city of Bologna. Home to the oldest university in Europe, Bologna fostered a unique artistic culture at the end of the Middle Ages. With its large population of sophisticated readers,… Read More