March 22–August 4, 2019

Connect/Disconnect: Growth in the “It” City

Conte Community Arts Gallery

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  • Mariah Clemons. Friends Enjoying the Spray, 2017. Archival pigment print.  Courtesy of the artist. © Mariah Clemons

  • Delia Seigenthaler. Udom Thompson Lane, 2018. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Delia Seigenthaler

  • Erik Doty. New Neighbors, 2018. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Erik Doty

  • Nick Zimmer. Disconnect, 2016. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Nick Zimmer

  • James Terry. Nashville, Tennessee, 2014. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © James Terry

  • Holly Abernathy. Listening to the Game Across the River, 2018. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Holly Abernathy

  • Erin McDermott. Working Woman, 2018. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Erin McDermott

  • Kim Balevre. Spaghetti Junction, 2016. Archival pigment print. Courtesy of the artist. © Kim Balevre

In 2013, The New York Times called Nashville an “it” city because of its economic health and rising cultural profile. A 2017 article in The Tennessean stated that Nashville’s population was expanding at a rate of one hundred new people every day. Neighborhoods have transformed, downtown has become a cultural center, and the city’s art scene has come into its own, but this progress has come with challenges, such as increased housing costs and a population that is rapidly outgrowing the city’s infrastructure.

The Frist Art Museum provided a platform for individuals to share their views by issuing a call for digital photography that addresses the theme of connection or disconnection in our communities. Nearly two hundred images were submitted by more than one hundred Davidson County residents, from which fifty photographs were chosen by a panel of jurors.

The resulting exhibition explores the rising connectivity between neighborhoods and communities, and the potential for disconnection between people and socioeconomic classes as the city strives to adapt to record growth. The images represent a range of perspectives, from depictions of friends and neighbors to old and new homes, construction sites, and recognizable landmarks.

Most of the photograph submissions will be digitally archived by the Nashville Public Library Special Collections Division.

JURORS
Marty Stuart, musician and photographer
Carlton Wilkinson, educator and photographer
Susan H. Edwards, executive director and CEO, Frist Art Museum
 

The Frist Art Museum is pleased to announce the 50 artists selected for this exhibition:

Holly Abernathy
Martha Armstrong
Kim Balevre
David Bennett
Elizabeth Berger
Sayre Berman
Mariah Clemons
Rae'chel Curtis
James DeMain
D’Anelle Desire
Ray Di Pietro
Erik Doty
Jo Fields
Jacqueline Flynn
Denise Fussell
Tony Gonzalez
Caroline Gumpenberger
Betty Harper
Alan Hayes
Bernadette Hugan
D. Elizabeth Jesse
Lisa Sivess Johnson
DaShawn Lewis
Kevin Lurey
Hamilton Masters
Kalonji McClellan
Erin McDermott
Don McEwen
Donna Moffitt
David Morel
Justin Near
Joshua Ness
Huy Nguyen
Joe Nuñez
Emily Passino
Julia Lynn Perkins
Mary Phelps
David Piñeros
John Roeder
Carey Rogers
Delia Seigenthaler
Brian Siskind
Gene Smith
Ben Spalding
Laura Sturgill
James Terry
Yukiko Ueda
Ramona Wiggins
Richard Wise
Nick Zimmer


Organized by the Frist Art Museum

We thank the Nashville Public Library’s Special Collections Division and our jurors: Susan H. Edwards, Marty Stuart, and Carlton Wilkinson.

The Frist Art Museum gratefully acknowledges the generosity of our O’Keeffe Circle members in funding this exhibition:

Judy and Joe Barker
Barbara and Jack Bovender
Richard and Judith Bracken
Patricia Frist Elcan and Charles A. Elcan
Jennifer and Billy Frist
Julie and Tommy Frist
Patricia C. Frist and Thomas F. Frist, Jr., MD
Lynn and Ken Melkus
Sid and Linda Pilson
Delphine and Ken Roberts
Anne and Joe Russell
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Seabury III
Olivia L. Tyson

 

Bonnaroo

Supporting Sponsor

US Bank

Supporting Sponsor

MNAC

Supported in part by

TAC

Supported in part by

NEA Artworks

Supported in part by

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